Sensing patients' needs 24/7

A contact-free patient monitoring system from Israel is winning attention and investment dollars for its potential to save lives, shorten hospital stays, and save money for patient-care facilities. Normally, nurses take vital signs only every four hours. EverOn’s continuous supervision of patient status allows for an immediate medical response to any change in the patient’s condition requiring intervention.

 Sensing patients' needs 24/7

 

Nurses are more comfortable attending to a patient knowing that their other patients are being constantly monitored by EarlySense's EverOn system.

By Avigayil Kadesh

A unique Israeli-made contact-free patient monitoring system is winning attention and investment dollars for its potential to save lives, shorten hospital stays, and save money for patient-care facilities.

The accuracy of the FDA-approved EverOn System to measure, record, and document respiration and heart rate automatically and continuously is detailed in a report published this month in the Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology. Its manufacturer, Ramat Gan-based EarlySense, also stresses the wider effects of its capabilities.

"We have been running clinical trials not just to show that EverOn is accurate, but also to show that it helps hospitals become safer and more efficient," says EarlySense CEO Avner Halperin. "Those using the system have found it helps them better manage the operation of their clinical teams."

Normally, nurses take vital signs only every four hours. EverOn’s continuous supervision of patient status allows for an immediate medical response to any change in the patient’s condition requiring intervention.

The system is comprised of an under-mattress sensor, a bedside monitor, and a central display system at the nurses’ station that simultaneously tracks the medical status of up to 36 patients. It also has an option for sensing motion, allowing nurses to see when a patient needs turning and when a patient exits the bed. In addition, it can send an alert to healthcare staff via a handheld mobile device when it senses a change needing immediate intervention.

 Sensing patients' needs 24/7

A nurse positions the EverOn under-mattress sensor. The full system comprises the sensor, a bedside monitor and a central display system at the nurses’ station.

A system that saves lives

EverOn showed a measurable difference for patients at several US and Israeli medical centers, where it was tested with children, adults and obese patients.

Dr. Harvey Brown, a pulmonologist and critical care specialist who was the principal investigator in the US trials, says EverOn detected an abnormally low respiratory rate in one of his post-surgical patients early enough to avoid a possible respiratory arrest. It led to the fast discovery of an abnormal heart rhythm in another patient, and alerted nurses to the progressively rising respiratory rate of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Each was successfully treated before the conditions worsened.

 

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