For hundreds of thousands of young people, Greta Thunberg is an icon. At only 16, she’s proving you don’t have to be an adult to make a world of a difference. Today, the Nobel Peace Prize nominee is among the most influential voices speaking out about Earth’s dire climate crisis. The teen first learned about the devastating, lasting impact of climate change when she was just 11 years old. Dismayed by adults’ unwillingness to respond, she decided to take action herself. She began by making small changes in her own life—cutting meat and dairy from her diet and convincing her parents to also live more sustainably. Frustrated by the lack of attention from policymakers, Greta held a strike in August 2018, missing class to sit in protest in front of the Swedish Parliament with a sign that read “Skolstrejk for Klimatet” (“School Strike for the Climate”). She vowed to hold strikes every Friday until Sweden was in alignment with the Paris Agreement. People in Sweden (and now, the world over) began to take notice of Greta’s stance. After a viral TED Talk where she explained her call to action, others began to join in her protests. Today, #FridaysforFuture has grown to be a global phenomenon, with hundreds of thousands of young people from over 125 countries standing alongside Greta. In addition to her Nobel Peace Prize nomination, Greta’s actions have earned her speaking engagements at the World Economic Forum and COP24—but most importantly, they’ve ignited a new generation to create change and stand up for the future. Greta says she owes her dogged determination in part to being on the spectrum: “I think if I wouldn’t have had Asperger’s I don’t think I would have started the school strike, I don’t think I would’ve cared about the climate at all… That allowed me to focus on one thing for a very long time.” Her #FridaysforFuture protest on March 15, 2019 drew 1.6 million strikers, from 2,000 locations, across all seven continents. She wants world leaders to know that change is coming, whether they like it or not. This is the fourth story in our series, “The Brave,” all about the incredible people protecting our Great Big Planet.


10


CNN

Latest News

FOX: Houston high school's new dress code takes aim at parents

FOX: California amputee who lost prosthetic leg while skydiving gets it back after deputy finds it in unlikely spot

CNN: Funerals begin for Sri Lanka victims

CNN: Food truck faces backlash for 'LGBTQ' T-shirts

CNN: USC coach who made fake crew profile for Lori Loughlin's daughter agrees to plead guilty

CNN: Couple gets 7 years in prison for forcing girl to work in their home for 16 years

CNN: A second man convicted in the death of James Byrd Jr. is set to be executed this week

CBS: Brothers involved in Jussie Smollett case sue for defamation

CBC: Teen terror accused back in jail after alleged bail breach

BBC: UK should be proud of climate efforts, says energy minister

BBC: Climate change: Miliband says UK should declare emergency

BBC: World Championship 2019: Judd Trump trails Thepchaiya Un-Nooh

WashingtonPost: Colt McCoy misses first week of Redskins’ workouts as he recovers from broken leg

WashingtonPost: ‘Mr. Game 7’ lost in Game 7 with the Caps. Now Justin Williams could take them out.

WashingtonPost: ‘Mr. Game 7’ lost in Game 7 with the Caps. Now Justin Williams could take them out.

WashingtonPost: Colt McCoy misses first week of Redskins’ workouts as he recovers from broken leg

NewYorkTimes: Saudi Arabia Executes 37 in One Day for Terrorism

NewYorkTimes: The Case for Marsala

NewYorkTimes: My Fellow Hasidic Jews Are Making a Terrible Mistake About Vaccinations

NewYorkTimes: Moore’s Columns Deriding Women Raise New Questions for Trump Fed Pick

NewYorkTimes: Navy SEALs Were Warned Against Reporting Their Chief for War Crimes

FOX: AP Interview: Slovenia leader says EU must counter populism

FOX: California amputee who lost prosthetic leg while skydiving gets it back after deputy finds it in unlikely spot